Tough Trivia, 4/26/21

Today’s Tough Trivia question: There are 24 active aircraft carriers in the world (of the horizontal take-off and landing type, not counting those which are strictly vertical take-off, or helicopter carriers). Five countries have one (France, India, Russia, Spain, and Thailand [though the fighter wing was retired from service in 2006]), four countries have two (Australia [though they don’t have any carrier-based fixed-wing aircraft], China, Italy, and the UK), and the United States has eleven. Name the active US aircraft carriers… in the order they were commissioned.

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18869-3Friday’s question was: Currently, the US Mint produces and circulates six coin denominations: cent, nickel, dime, quarter, half dollar, and dollar. But those aren’t the only denominations the US has minted: in past years, there were several other denominations. How many others can you name? Bonus points if you know which years they circulated.

The answer is:

Half cent, 1793–1857.
Two cents, 1863–1873.
Three cents, 1865–1889.
Half dime (worth five cents, but considered a different denomination than the nickel), 1792–1873 (the nickel entered circulation in 1866).
s-l1000Twenty cents, 1875–1878.
Gold dollar, 1849–1889.
Quarter eagle ($2.50), 1849–1889.
Three dollars, 1854–1889.
Half eagle ($5.00), 1795–1929.
Eagle ($10.00) ,1795–1933.
Double eagle ($20.00), 1849–1933.

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Ian’s Tough Trivia is a daily feature of this blog. Each day, I post a tough question, as well as the answer to the previous day’s question. At some point, I’ll offer a prize for whoever has the most correct answers, and another for whoever participates most often (I’ll take into account people coming in after the start: regular participation starting later is just as good as regular participation starting earlier). There may also be a prize for the funniest or most amusing wrong answer. Simply comment on this post with your answer. I’ll approve the comments after the next question is posted. Sure, you can probably find the answers by searching the web, but what’s the fun in that?

Financial support in the form of tips is very much appreciated: paypal.me/ianrandalstrock

Tough Trivia, 4/23/21

Pierre_de_Coubertin_Anefo2
Pierre de Coubertin

Yesterday’s question was: Baron Pierre de Coubertin (1863–1937) founded the International Olympic Committee (IOC) in 1894, which lead to the first modern Games in Athens, Greece, in 1896. The Games were held every four years, and were only cancelled during the World Wars, in 1916, 1940, and 1944, and postponed in 2020 due to the Covid-19 pandemic. In 1924, the number of sports in competition expanded with the commencement of the winter Olympics (first held in Chamonix, France). The years of the winter and summer games were split following 1992, with the then-next winter Olympics held in 1994. So, the questions are: Which five countries hosted the most Olympic games? And how many different countries have hosted the Olympics? Bonus: which years were the Olympics held in the United States?

The answer is:

1. With eight already in the books and one planned, far and away the most popular country to host the Olympics is the USA. The summer games were held in St. Louis in 1904, Los Angeles in 1932 and 1984 (and planned for LA in 2028), Atlanta in 2002. The winter games were in Lake Placid in 1932 and 1980, Squaw Valley in 1960, and Salt Lake City in 2002.

2. France has hosted the games five times, with another one planned: Paris in 1900 and 1924 (and planned again for 2024), and winter games in Chamonix (1924), Grenoble (1968), and Albertville (1992).

3. Three countries are tied, hosting the Olympics four times. Germany in Berlin in 1916 and 1936, Munich (West Germany, during the Cold War) in 1972, and winter games in Garmisch-Partenkirchen in 1936.
Italy has hosted three times, with one more planned: Rome in 1960, and winter games in Cortina d’Ampezzo in 1956, Turin in 2006, and Milan-Cortina d’Ampezzo planned for 2026.
Japan has hosted three times, with one coming up soon: Tokyo in 1964, winter games in Sapporo in 1972 and Nagano in 1998, and the 2020 Summer Olympics planned for Tokyo have been postponed due to the pandemic.

Twenty-three different countries have hosted Olympics: Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, China, Finland, France, Germany (and West Germany), Greece, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Netherlands, Norway, Russia (and the USSR), South Korea, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the USA.

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Today’s question is:

Currently, the US Mint produces and circulates six coin denominations: cent, nickel, dime, quarter, half dollar, and dollar. But those aren’t the only denominations the US has minted: in past years, there were several other denominations. How many others can you name? Bonus points if you know which years they circulated. (Remember, Tough Trivia takes the weekend off, so the answer will be posted Monday.)

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Ian’s Tough Trivia is a daily feature of this blog. Each day, I post a tough question, as well as the answer to the previous day’s question. At some point, I’ll offer a prize for whoever has the most correct answers, and another for whoever participates most often (I’ll take into account people coming in after the start: regular participation starting later is just as good as regular participation starting earlier). There may also be a prize for the funniest or most amusing wrong answer. Simply comment on this post with your answer. I’ll approve the comments after the next question is posted. Sure, you can probably find the answers by searching the web, but what’s the fun in that?

Financial support in the form of tips is very much appreciated: paypal.me/ianrandalstrock

 

Tough Trivia, 4/19/21

Friday’s question was: Cent, nickel, dime, quarter, half dollar, and dollar. The US has six circulating coin denominations. List them in order of the longevity of the current design. Bonus points if you can name whose face is on each obverse, and what design is on the corresponding reverses.

The answer is:

proofset2017Dime, 1946. The year after he died, the Mercury dime was phased out in honor of Franklin Delano Roosevelt, with a new torch, oak branch, and olive branch design on the reverse.

Half dollar, 1964. John Kennedy was assassinated in late 1963. In 1964, he bumped Benjamin Franklin off the half dollar, appearing with the seal of the President on the reverse. In 1976, the seal was replaced with an image of Independence Hall for the Bicentennial, but then the seal returned in 1977.

Nickel, 2006. In 1938, Thomas Jefferson’s portrait first appeared on the nickel, paired with his home, Monticello, on the reverse. In 2004 and 2005, there were four special designs honoring the bicentennial of Lewis & Clark’s expedition. In 2006, Monticello returned to the reverse with a new portrait of Jefferson on the obverse.

Cent, 2010. Abraham Lincoln’s portrait was placed on the obverse in 1909, with a wheat stalk reverse design. In 1959, the reverse was changed to an image of the Lincoln Memorial. In 2009, there were special reverse designs honoring Lincoln’s bicentennial. And in 2010, the current shield design first appeared on the reverse.

Quarter, less than three months ago. In 1932, George Washington first appeared on the obverse of the quarter, with a heraldic eagle on the reverse. In 1976, the quarter (and half dollar and dollar coins) had a special Bicentennial reverse design: a colonial military drummer. The eagle returned in 1977. In 1999, the State Quarter Series debuted, with a redesigned obverse, and five different reverses minted during the year, representing each of the states. After ten years, the Mint realized the changing designs were popular, and continued, covering DC and the territories in 2009, and then representing national parks and landmarks starting in 2010 (still, with five new designs each year).

Dollar, 2009 (sort of). In 2000, the smaller-than-a-half dollar sized, silver colored dollar coin with Susan B. Anthony’s portrait was replaced by the same-sized, gold colored dollar coin with Sacagawea on the obverse and a bald eagle in flight on the reverse. Starting in 2009, the reverse was changed to several different Native American themes. Since 2012, the Mint has only produced these coins for collector sets and stockpiles, because of their unpopularity. At the same time (2007–2016, plus more coming), the Mint produced Presidential dollar coins, with images of deceased Presidents on them. Again, for circulation, but since 2012, newly minted coins have not been released into circulation because of a lack of demand. Finally, beginning in 2018, the Mint began producing American Innovation dollars, with the State of Liberty on the obverse, and four different images (representing four different states) on the reverse. The Mint claims these are coins for circulation, but the lack of demand keeps them from entering circulation as normal.

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Today’s question is: Only one US President has also served as Speaker of the House of Representatives. Who was it? Similarly, only one US President has also served on the Supreme Court. Who was that?

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Ian’s Tough Trivia is a daily feature of this blog. Each day, I post a tough question, as well as the answer to the previous day’s question. At some point, I’ll offer a prize for whoever has the most correct answers, and another for whoever participates most often (I’ll take into account people coming in after the start: regular participation starting later is just as good as regular participation starting earlier). There may also be a prize for the funniest or most amusing wrong answer. Simply comment on this post with your answer. I’ll approve the comments after the next question is posted. Sure, you can probably find the answers by searching the web, but what’s the fun in that?

Financial support in the form of tips is very much appreciated: paypal.me/ianrandalstrock

Tough Trivia, 4/16/21

Yesterday’s question was: “Name the US Space Shuttles. How many missions into space did each Space Shuttle fly? Which Shuttle is now at which museum?”

IMG_5251The answer is:

  • Columbia (OV-102), first flew on April 12, 1981. Completed 27 missions, and disintegrated during re-entry on its 28th mission, on February 1, 2003.
  • Challenger (OV-099), first flew April 4, 1983. Completed nine missions, and exploded 73 seconds after launch on its 10th mission, on January 28, 1986.
  • Discovery (OV-103), first flew on August 30, 1984. Completed 39 missions, landing for the final time on March 9, 2011. Discovery is on display at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center of the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum at Dulles International Airport, Fairfax County, Virginia.
  • Atlantis (OV-104), first flew on October 3, 1985. Completed 33 missions, landing for the final time on July 21, 2011. Atlantis is on display at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, Merritt Island, Florida.
  • Endeavour (OV-105), first flew May 7, 1992. Completed 25 missions, landing for the final time on June 1, 2011. Endeavour is on display at the California Science Center, Los Angeles, California.
  • Enterprise (OV-101) was built as a test vehicle, without engines or a functional heat shield, and thus, not capable of spaceflight. It flew in the atmosphere after, being released from its Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, five times between August 12 and October 26, 1977. Enterprise is on display at the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum, New York, New York.
  • Pathfinder (unofficially known as OV-098) is a Space Shuttle test simulator made of steel and wood. Constructed in 1977 as an unnamed facilities test article, it was used to check roadway clearances, crane capabilities, and so on. After the Space Shuttle program no longer needed it, it was sold to the America-Japan Society, which displayed it in the Great Space Shuttle Exhibition in Tokyo from 1983 to 1984. Then it returned to the US, and is on display at the US Space & Rocket Center in Huntsville, Alabama.

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Today’s question is: Cent, nickel, dime, quarter, half dollar, and dollar. The US has six circulating coin denominations. List them in order of the longevity of the current design. Bonus points if you can name whose face is on each obverse, and what design is on the corresponding reverses.

***

Ian’s Tough Trivia is a daily feature of this blog. Each day, I post a tough question, as well as the answer to the previous day’s question. At some point, I’ll offer a prize for whoever has the most correct answers, and another for whoever participates most often (I’ll take into account people coming in after the start: regular participation starting later is just as good as regular participation starting earlier). There may also be a prize for the funniest or most amusing wrong answer. Simply comment on this post with your answer. I’ll approve the comments after the next question is posted. Sure, you can probably find the answers by searching the web, but what’s the fun in that?

Financial support in the form of tips is very much appreciated: paypal.me/ianrandalstrock

Tough Trivia, 4/15/21

Yesterday’s question was: “On the stock exchanges, companies are known by their ticker symbols: two- or three- or four-letter codes denoting the companies. With 26 possible letters in each slot, there are a very large number of possibilities. But there are also 20 companies with single-letter ticker symbols. How many of them can you name?”

The answer is:

A = Agilent Technologies (an analytical instrument manufacturer, headquartered in Santa Clara, California)
B = Barnes Group (an industrial and aerospace manufacturer and service provider, headquartered in Bristol, Connecticut)
C = Citigroup
D = Dominion Energy (a power and energy company, headquartered in Richmond, Virginia)
E = Eni S.p.A. (an Italian multinational oil and gas company)
F = Ford Motor Company
G = Genpact (a professional services firm, headquartered in New York City)
H = Hyatt
J = Jacobs Engineering Group (a technical professional services firm, headquartered in Dallas, Texas)
K = Kellogg’s
L = Loews Corporation (an American conglomerate holding majority stakes in Altium Packaging, Boardwalk Pipeline Partners, CNA Financial, Diamond Offshore Drilling, and Loews Hotels)
M = Macy’s
O = Realty Income Corporation (a real estate investment trust, headquartered in San Diego, California)
R = Ryder System Inc. (a transportation and logistics company, known for its rental trucks)
T = AT&T
V = Visa, Inc.
W = Wayfair (an e-commerce company that sells furniture and home goods, headquartered in Boston, Massachusetts)
X = U.S. Steel
Y = Alleghany Corporation (an investment holding company headquartered in New York City)
Z = Zillow (an online real estate marketplace company, headquartered in Seattle, Washington)

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800px-STS120LaunchHiRes-edit1Today’s question: Name the US Space Shuttles. How many missions into space did each Space Shuttle fly? Which Shuttle is now at which museum?

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Ian’s Tough Trivia is a daily feature of this blog. Each day, I post a tough question, as well as the answer to the previous day’s question. At some point, I’ll offer a prize for whoever has the most correct answers, and another for whoever participates most often (I’ll take into account people coming in after the start: regular participation starting later is just as good as regular participation starting earlier). There may also be a prize for the funniest or most amusing wrong answer. Simply comment on this post with your answer. I’ll approve the comments after the next question is posted. Sure, you can probably find the answers by searching the web, but what’s the fun in that?

Financial support in the form of tips is very much appreciated: paypal.me/ianrandalstrock

Tough Trivia, 4/14/21

Grant_WoodYesterday’s question was “Who were the models used by Grant Wood when he painted American Gothic?”

The answer is: Grant Wood (1891–1942) painted American Gothic in 1930. He used his sister, Nan Wood Graham (1899–1990, who also appears in a portrait he painted of her in 1933) and their dentist, Dr. Byron McKeeby (1867–1950) from Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Nan told people her brother had envisioned the pair as father and daughter, not husband and wife, which Wood himself confirmed in a letter in 1941: “The prim lady with him is his grown-up daughter.”

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Today’s question: On the stock exchanges, companies are known by their ticker symbols: two- or three- or four-letter codes denoting the companies. With 26 possible letters in each slot, there are a very large number of possibilities. But there are also 20 companies with single-letter ticker symbols. How many of them can you name?

***

Ian’s Tough Trivia is a daily feature of this blog. Each day, I post a tough question, as well as the answer to the previous day’s question. At some point, I’ll offer a prize for whoever has the most correct answers, and another for whoever participates most often (I’ll take into account people coming in after the start: regular participation starting later is just as good as regular participation starting earlier). There may also be a prize for the funniest or most amusing wrong answer. Simply comment on this post with your answer. I’ll approve the comments after the next question is posted. Sure, you can probably find the answers by searching the web, but what’s the fun in that?

Financial support in the form of tips is very much appreciated: paypal.me/ianrandalstrock